A barrel tile roof gives your home a beautiful and timeless look, but there are some downsides as well. The first and main negative side effect is that such a roof attracts wild animals that are a nuisance to your home. That’s mainly because the space between the underlay and the tiles offers a warm and safe place for them to shelter.

There are some cases where such animals even chew or tear through the tarpaper that is found below the tiles in your roof construction, and find their way into your attic. Bats are one of the main animals that may choose to shelter beneath your tile roof since the conditions there are perfect for their
survival.

Do Bats Roost Under Tile Roofs?

If you are wondering whether bats can roost under barrel tile roofs, the answer is yes. However, not all types of bats will find such a tight space comfortable to spend their resting time.

In that light, the most common species of bats in Florida that likes to roost under barrel tile roofs are the Brazilian Free-tailed bats. It roosts almost always in man-made structures, primarily, houses. A colony of these bats is easy to recognize from a distance due to the musky odor that they emit.

Long-eared bats, on the other hand, will prefer larger spaces such as inside the roof void, mainly along the ridge. The Tri-Colored bats, formerly known as the Eastern Pipistrelles are Florida's smallest bats. The species has relatively long ears and only occasionally roosts in buildings singly or in small groups.

How Do You Know if You Have Bats in Your Roof?

Even though bats are common, they can inhabit your home undetected. The majority of homeowners who have had infestations in the past didn’t have the slightest idea of the presence of bats in their homes. Taking into consideration that bats usually hibernate during winter and are only active at night during summer, it’s no wonder they are so difficult to detect.

However, the following signs should indicate that you more than likely have bats living in the space between your roof tiles and the underlay.

Bat Droppings: The surefire way to know that you have bats living in your home is if you see their droppings. The droppings from bats (also known as bat guano) look a lot like those from mice in color and size. However, bat droppings, unlike mice droppings, will crumble to dust when pressure is applied to them.

The most common places where you are likely to come across such droppings in on sills, windows, around chimneys, walls, as well as under the ridge of the roof void if the bats are roosting there.

Bats Flying at Sunset or Sunrise: If you notice one or more bats around your home every morning or evening, there is a likelihood that the bats are roosting somewhere near your home, if not inside your home. If in particular, they are roosting in the space between the tiles and underfelt, you may not detect their presence so easily.

Bat Chattering: It’s also possible to identify bats from the sounds that they make. Even though bats are quiet in the majority of cases since they communicate by emitting sonar, there are times when they also make chattering sounds.

The sound, which is more like a high-pitched squeaking or scratching sound is more common at dusk when the bats fly out to feed. You can also expect to hear the sound more in July and August from babies as they call out to their mothers while they come back from hunting.

Stains at Entry and Exit Points: Bats leave a greasy spot when they enter your home as a result of the layer of grease on their coats. If you ever see any greasy spots on areas of your house that have holes, you may want to inspect your house further to determine if you have a bat infestation.

Final Words,

Bat infestations in tile roofs are more common than you may expect, and the majority of them go undetected for some time. For this reason, you may want to have your home and roof inspected for infestations once in a while.

It is also recommended that you leave bat removal to experts, taking into consideration that bats are protected by law from improper removal in some states such as Florida. Thus, knowing that there are bats living under your tile roof, their access to their roost sites must not be hindered.

If you encounter any problems with bats in the roof, call Wildlife Troopers at (561) 809 – 4572 today to learn more about our bat control services or to set up a free inspection.

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